Alice Bailey

If you found your way to this page then you either know of Alice Bailey and her work, or are curious to learn about the contribution she made to Western Esoteric Thought. You may have found her name associated with conspiracy theories which promulgate the idea that a New World Order is being sort by advocates of the Black Lodge, the Illuminati and so on. Alice Bailey was not seeking to instigate a sinister global takeover.

I completed a doctoral thesis in 2006 (I was Isobel Wightman then) entitled The texts of Alice A. Bailey : an inquiry into the role of esotericism in transforming consciousness
which you may read in pdf form here:

http://arrow.uws.edu.au:8080/vital/access/manager/Repository/uws:3753

And here is a mention of my work, and of Alice Bailey by James Davis (2007) in the Journal of Esoteric Psychology (Volume 4, Number 1 Winter 2008). ‘Alice Bailey’s spoke against orthodox Christianity, American isolationism, nationalism, Soviet totalitarianism, fascism, and Nazism. She also criticized Zionism and the Jewish religion and history.[Lucis] Her criticisms resulted in attacks by those who see passages in her writings as racist and anti-Semitic.

Internet searches show extensive criticism of Bailey, particularly from those identified with Judiasm and various Christian churches. Numerous sources assert that her views are racist, anti-Semitic, and anti-Christian. Many Christian sites claim she is the devil’s disciple or even Satan incarnate. Most of this material has the character of emotionally charged attacks and there is little that approaches the subject from a scholarly standpoint. It is common for critics to take passages out of context or even attribute to Bailey the exact opposite of what she wrote. A dissertation by Isobel Wightman [Wightman, Isobel , The Texts of Alice A. Bailey: An Inquiry into the Role of Esotericism in Transforming Consciousness, University of Western Sydney, 2006] is one exception to this. While highly critical of Bailey, Wightman does attempt a scholarly assessment of her writings in a broader sense.’

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