Celebrating Odyssey Books Ten Year Milestone with a Special Discount of A Perfect Square

Celebrating the Tenth Anniversary of Odyssey Books with a Special Discount of A Perfect Square

Odyssey Books have been going since 2009. They are a terrific little press, punching above their weight, with an impressive list of authors and high calibre titles. I joined the small press in 2015 when Odyssey Books released my first two novels, Asylum and The Drago Tree. In 2016, they published my third novel, A Perfect Square. This weekend, Odyssey Books are having a special sale of A Perfect Square to celebrate their anniversary! (check out the other titles they have on offer in July)

ABOUT A PERFECT SQUARE

Across two continents, two sets of mothers and daughters are bound by a dark mystery.

On a winter’s day in the Dandenongs, Victoria, pianist Ginny returns home to stay with her eccentric mother and artist, Harriet. Consumed by disturbing dreams, speculations and remembering, she tries to prise from her mother the truth concerning her father’s disappearance and why, when she was seven, Harriet abducted her. In an effort to distract her daughter’s interrogations, Harriet proposes they collaborate on an exhibition of paintings and songs.

Meanwhile, on the edge of Dartmoor, Judith paints landscapes of the Australian Outback to soothe her troubled mind. Her wayward daughter, Madeleine, has returned home and she’s filled the house with darkness. Her father doesn’t want to know her. Judith wishes he did. When at last she forces the two to meet she breathes a sigh of relief.

Back in Australia, Ginny is poised to fly to England in search of the truth when she receives some earth-shattering news.

A novel brimming with mystery, intrigue, creativity, art and the occult.

 

ONLY $0.99 on Kindle viewbook.at/PerfectSquare

 

A Very Special Review of A Perfect Square

About forty five minutes by car to the east of Melbourne brings you to the Dandenongs. A small mountain range strewn with a magical semi-tropical rainforest, full of tall mountain ash, giant tree ferns and crystal trickling creeks.  Mast Gully was so named by an old sailing captain, in the days of the first settlers, who said the tall straight trees reminded him of nothing so much as a forest of ships masts. The area has attracted artists and musicians since its very earliest days, the painter Tom Roberts used to live and paint here, and William Ricketts of the famous sanctuary in Olinda, used to be a jazz clarinettist. A bustling, vibrant, ever-changing colony of artistic types has inhabited the hills, gullies and quaint little towns ever since.

It is in this idyllic setting that Isobel Blackthorn has placed ‘A Perfect Square’. At the heart of this delightful tale is an artistic collaboration between Harriet, a somewhat neurotic painter with a hidden past, and her daughter Ginny, a musician with deep questions about her absent father. At the same time far across the sea on the moors of Dorset, England, another mother daughter relationship is being played out by Judith and her daughter Madeleine. Judith too, is a painter, also wrestling with her work and her past and her relationships. The two stories play as counterpoint to each other, as the story ducks and weaves around Astrology, Art history, music, occultism and the power of a past, not fully come to terms with, to invade and choke the present.  As the two girls become unhappier, winter approaches, the gallery presentation comes nearer, and the story itself begins to become darker before finally resolving in very surprising ways.

There is more than a touch of ‘AbFab’ about the relationships between some of the characters, and as someone with more than a passing acquaintanceship with the Dandenongs, I was surprised by how much I enjoyed spending time with them all. I have known these people, gone to their homes and eaten their food and drunk their wine, far into the evening. Musicians and practitioners of the static Arts will find much to interest them in this story as both subjects are not merely touched upon but form an integral part of the structure of this tale.

In a case of ‘life imitating Art’ or ‘Art imitating life’, the authors own daughter has contributed musical works that echo the collaboration in the story, and these are also available to the reader through web links at the back of the book?

I was somewhat hesitant approaching ‘A Perfect Square’ as something seemed to be saying that it might have been a little too serious for my mood. I could not have been more wrong.  I heartily recommend this to anyone who likes fascinating and believable characters, well drawn settings and just enough mystery to keep the whole thing bubbling along nicely. The sort of book you almost want to start reading again, the moment you have finished it, and I have to confess, I enjoyed it immensely…

– Film and Book Critic, Philip A. Wallis.

Accompanying music by jazz pianist and composer Elizabeth Blackthorn:

https://elizabethblackthorn.bandcamp.com/album/a-perfect-square

https://open.spotify.com/album/6BWFjoq8tuvyrg7w9FYjUC

https://music.apple.com/us/album/a-perfect-square-ep/1149154120

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Book Review: Persian Letters by Mehrdad Rafiee

 

About Persian Letters

Mehrdad Rafiee grew up in Iran at a time of constant change. Born in 1950 in Abadan, as the oil industry was being d nationalised, he went to high school in Kazeroun during the White Revolution of 1963, and attended university in Tehran in the years of social upheaval that led to the Islamic Revolution. This memoir is written in the form of letters addressed to his sons. Mehrdad tells his life story, with diversions into Persian/Iranian history and politics, drawing parallels between the turmoil in his country and that in his life. In writing his memoirs, Mehrdad was inspired by the books of two very special writers: Orhan Pamuk’s “Istanbul: Memories and the City”, and Azar Nafisi’s “Things I’ve Been Silent About”. For anyone familiar with modern Iran, this book will inform and entertain, as it explains much that lies behind the changes and the culture of Iran and its people. Mehrdad has lived in Australia since 1985.

My Thoughts

As I began reading Persian Letters I asked myself what I knew about Iran. I am embarrassed to admit not a huge amount. I have a sense of Persia, I have read some Rumi, I have found the Iranian people I have met to be warm and gracious. I know it is a large country with its share of desert. Of course, we in the west who are of any decent age would have heard of the Shah and the revolution and Ayatollah Khomeini. And no one with any education can talk of Iran without knowing some of its history with oil. And yes, it is a Shi’ite Muslim nation.

There you have it, the summation of my knowledge prior to reading Rafiee’s book.

Now, I know a lot more, and I have received the perfect form of education, provided in a clear and well written fashion, seeing through the eyes of a man reflecting back on his childhood and his teenage years, and then as an adult before leaving the country of his birth in the early 1980s. Persian Letters is a memoir written as a series of letters to the author’s sons. The reader is gifted a window on an intimate world, a secret world almost, in what is an intriguing and engaging read. Honesty, integrity, the laying bare of family history, customs, and above all the Iranian people’s struggle with change, shine through the pages.

Persian Letters is a Persian tale, not a tale of Islamic culture, but of the ancient culture beneath, rooted in Zoroastrianism. Politics, history, customs and traditions, society, the economy, the entire fabric of Iranian life is woven into a series of entertaining vignettes. I especially enjoyed the gentle irony and some of the subtly critical observations. And the intermingling families, village life, the making of tea!

Rafiee has a unique perspective, largely due to his father’s propensity for change. Rafiee grew up in the privileged enclave of Abadan, an island in Iran’s southwest, almost bordering Kuwait, where thanks to British Petroleum western services were in abundance. So much for the generous British, who had effectively stolen the rights to the oil they extracted from an obliging Iran! Then Refiee’s dad ups sticks and relocates the family to a poor part of southern Iran to battle as a farmer. The narrative also takes in Shiraz and Tehran in what can only be described a feast for the ignorant, and a must read for most of us.

There are footnotes explaining some of the words and providing brief bios of some of the cameo characters. There is just so much to relish in this rather long read. Refiee has given the world a rich tapestry of Persian culture, and a rare insight into the motivations and complexities of a country we hear too little of other than in the negative. Through Refiee’s eyes, the reader is presented with a sharing, giving culture rooted in ancient past, a people resistant to change, and the inevitable struggles of modernisation that ensue. What better way is there to embrace difference than through reading a book such as this. I commend the author for making the effort to write down his story and give it to the world.

Grab your copy here

Book review: No Room for Regret by Janeen Ann O’Connell

About No Room for Regret

London, 1811

Chained below deck, 18-year-old James Tedder listens to the sobs of his fellow prisoners. Putting his hand over his nose to filter the vile smells, James wonders how life on the other side of the world could ever be worth living.

London, 1812

Sarah Blay watches the convict ship Indefatigable begin its voyage to the other side of the world with her husband, and his friend James Tedder, on board. One year later, Sarah bundles up her three small sons and says a final goodbye to her mother, and follows her husband to Van Diemen’s Land on a dangerous journey that will take fourteen long months.

Will Sarah regret her decision, and will any of them survive?

My Thoughts

Opening No Room for Regret the reader is grabbed by the collar and thrust into the worlds of twin protagonists James Tedder and James Blay as they are both arrested, charged and transported as convicts to Hobart Town, Tasmania, Australia. Tedder leaves behind his family of origin; Blay leaves his wife, Sarah, and their three sons. After a terrible voyage lasting many months, the men arrive and face some early tribulations, but then both find good fortune in securing positions away from the chain gangs. Tedder works in the stores and Blay for a former convict, James Cullen, on his farm in New Norfolk. What unfolds as these two men serve their sentences is a heartwarming and heartbreaking tale of families intertwining, of convicts gaining their freedom and adjusting to life in a new and strange world filled with curious animals and birds. It is a tale of resilience, survival and common humanity. There are a few antagonists along the way to keep up the tension and the drama, including the despicable Toothless, a convict guard out on a lifelong vendetta to harm Tedder.

Filled with charming characters and well-crafted descriptions, this story flows at a good clip. Above all, O’Connell provides a rich historical overview of the early settlement of Australia, prefacing her chapters with snippets of factual information which add important insights into the plight of the convicts and renders No Room for Regret both entertaining and educational.

The perennial challenge for historical and especially family history novels is grabbing readers from the outset and keeping them absorbed. O’Connell manages both with aplomb, the narration taut and gripping and laced with uncompromising realism. The result is a compelling read that is impossible to put down. No Room for Regret is a fictionalised family history novel of the highest calibre.

Book Review – Sangre: The wrong side of tomorrow by Carlos Colon

About Sangre: The wrong side of tomorrow

The harrowing saga of Nicky Negron’s tortured soul continues as the inner and outer demons shadowing Newark, New Jersey’s undead vigilante have no intention of letting him rest in peace. Knowing his paranormal existence can only lead to complications, Nicky tries not to draw too much attention to himself. This becomes difficult as he learns that he has captured the interest of an unrelenting federal agent. Suspected of being an assassin for a South American drug cartel, Nicky finds himself dealing with the exact kind of scrutiny he’s been trying to avoid since he was turned almost thirty years ago. It complicates matters even more when Nicky is confronted with another undead presence that is threatening to commit atrocities to the children of a friend Nicky had sworn to protect. This pits the foul-mouthed night stalker, Nicky Negron, against the most horrifying monsters – both the human and non-human variety. An absolute rollercoaster of a novel, Sangre: The Wrong Side of Tomorrow delivers even more suspense, insight, laughs, and emotional wallop than its predecessor. Nicky is back! See you on the other side…

My Thoughts

After a newspaper clipping relating a spate of beheadings in Brooklyn, including a drug dealer and a domestic abuse suspect – the reporter noting a new trend in gangland murders across the USA – Sangre: The wrong side of tomorrow opens with a scene on a public bus in New York on a hot August day in the 1960s as a young Nicky Negrón observes his surroundings and reflects on his life. Nicky is off to Alexander’s department store; he’s missing his little sister, Dani, and his relationship with his mother in the protracted aftermath of Dani’s death.

Skip forward to Nicky as he is now, as his genetically resistant undead self, having battled the evil vampire, Simone, in the first Sangre novel (if you have not read Sangre: The Color of Dying do so now because you are missing out on a terrific read. Although Sangre 2 can be read as a standalone) Nicky finds himself having vivid memories that could only belong to Simone, who he believes he had slayed. Apparently not. Terrified she is out to take full possession of him, he seeks the help of Dr Gunder, an epidemiologist turned vampire researcher and investigator, a doctor seeking to avenge the death of her son. What unfolds is so thoroughly entertaining it can be read in one sitting.

The story jumps back from time to time to Nicky’s past, providing a rich insight into the motivations and depth of his character. A deft catch up of Sangre 1 and Colon dives straight into the action. The attention to fine detail and small observances – the sweat, the smells, the settings – while never overplayed evoke in the imagination a gritty, urban vibe of working class life, especially for the Hispanic community: Nicky’s family are from Puerto Rico. The pace is fast in a four-to-the-floor read, slowed only by the reflections of the main character as he wrestles with his one inner nature and attempts to justify his less noble actions. I really enjoyed Colon’s utilitarian take on morality – the greatest happiness for the greatest number, or in this case, the least harm to the least number – as Nicky is compelled to feed on the blood of others. The author’s empathy for Hispanic culture shines through, as does his understanding that good and bad is never clearly defined, that life is filled with compromises, that sometimes a purely good choice is not an option and that forgiveness is possible. The novel is enriched by the theme of mothers and their bond with their offspring. A theme that plays out through the juxtaposition of Nicky’s own mother and her attitude to him, with the other mothers in the story.

In all, a thoroughly pleasurable and intelligent read with broad appeal that reaches beyond the confines of the horror genre. Highly recommended.

Find you copy of Sangre: The Wrong Side of Tomorrow on Amazon

Book Review: Overture by Vanessa Couchman

Overture

What if you had a unique talent, but everything conspired against your dreams?

France, 1897. Born to a modest farming family, Marie-Thérèse has a remarkable singing voice and wants to become a professional singer. But too many obstacles, including her parents’ opposition, stand in her way. And, through no fault of her own, she makes a dangerous enemy of the local landlord.

When the family circumstances change suddenly, Marie-Thérèse and her mother must move to Paris to work in her aunt’s restaurant. Her ambitions rekindle, but the road to success is paved with setbacks until a chance meeting gives her a precious opportunity.

She is close to achieving all her dreams, but the ghosts of the past come back to haunt her and threaten Marie-Thérèse’s life as well as her career.

My Review

Overture presents a charming and realistic portrait of early nineteenth century rural France and the struggles that befall a humble farmer’s daughter doomed to labour for her parents and a future husband, a daughter with a natural talent, a gift that sets her apart. From the outset, Marie-Thérèse is forced to face the restrictions of her circumstances, and this she does with resentment but also with loyalty and respect. She is a dutiful daughter, not wilful or rebellious. Opportunity comes her way when her widowed mother moves them to Paris to stay with her sister, Marie-Thérèse’s aunt.

Couchman has penned a slow-paced and charming coming-of-age tale. The author’s knowledge of the setting and period appear sound and she has crafted a convincing and well-rounded protagonist in Marie-Thérèse. The supporting cast are equally well-presented and the pacing and plot twists are executed with aplomb. A light an entertaining read, Overture will appeal to those who enjoy their historical fiction unladen with complex detail and exposition. Recommended.

Purchase Link

http://mybook.to/OvertureBook1

Author Bio – Vanessa Couchman is a novelist, short story author and freelance writer and has lived in an 18th-century farmhouse in southwest France since 1997. French and Corsican history and culture provide great inspiration for her fiction. She has written two novels set on the Mediterranean island of Corsica: The House at Zaronza and The Corsican Widow. Her third novel, Overture, is Book 1 of a trilogy set in France between 1897 and 1945. Vanessa’s short stories have won and been placed in creative writing competitions and published in anthologies.

Social Media Links –

Website: https://vanessacouchmanwriter.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vanessacouchman.author/

Twitter:  https://twitter.com/Vanessainfrance

Amazon Author Page: http://author.to/VanessaCouchman

 

 

The Ada Cambridge Prose Prize 2019

 

Reaching the shortlist of the Ada Cambridge Prose Prize!

It is every author’s much coveted dream. When I opened the email from the Williamstown Festival committee and saw the first word, ‘Congratulations!’, I nearly fell off my seat. Me, who never wins a thing, well, truth be told rarely enters a competition, finding my story, ‘Nothing to Declare’, selected out of countless hundreds in a statewide competition was momentous. Especially since the Ada Cambridge Prose Prize for biographical fiction is one of Australia’s prestigious literary prizes.

Here I am on stage with the other shortlisted entrants. I was so nervous! I don’t mind being on stage when I am performing or launching a book, but lined up like that with the others with nothing to do but listen and stare at the audience was not a fun experience.

I didn’t win the Adas. Congratulations to David Francis, who did. All of us lined up on stage hoped to win, but in hindsight winning doesn’t matter. Never mind the cherry. The cake is enough. Best of all I spent the occasion with a new and delightful friend. Karen Crombie of Exact Editing cast her sharp eye over my story prior to submission so it was very special for me to have her beside me during the event. She took these smashing photos too!  I must also thank author Clare Rhoden for encouraging me to apply (read my author interview on her website) and Philip Wallis, for reading and commenting on my story and for just being a terrific literary friend.

Reaching the shortlist for this story is special for another reason. ‘Nothing to Declare’ is a version of the first chapter of my forthcoming historical novel based on my great grandmother’s life.

A Matter of Latitude #BookTour Wrap Up

A Matter of Latitude Book Tour

There were thirty stops on this tour, with twenty-two reviews, all of them filled with praise. No one made these reviewers say what they have, which makes this a tour worth celebrating. Below are quoted extracts from the tour. My hat is off to tour host Rachel Gilbey of Rachel’s Random Resources. She is efficient, prompt and incredibly well-organised. And a big thank you to the bloggers!

Tenesar

Book Tour Review Highlights

“This book in set in Lanzarote and the author paints a beautiful description of the island.” The Divine Write

“Not only a mystery, but a great drama about corruption set in a lovely island…This story is thoughtful and emotional and is telling about themes like corruption, ecology and the characters have depth and as always the atmospheric setting is beautiful…” Fany Van Hemelen

“This is a great read, a proper whodunnit based on corruption in what most of us will consider the idyll of Lanzarote. The story is told in first person, with alternating viewpoints from married couple Paula & Celestino (every now and then a chapter creeps in told from the viewpoint of Richard, an author wanting to write a captivating thriller – a genius move, if you ask me!)

The web of corruption is gradually revealed, and Celestino’s “disappearance” is only the start. (By disappearance, read: being forced off the road, over a cliff, hunted by a rabid dog and wanted by those whose fraudulent and corrupt methods he seeks to expose).

The conclusion will keep the reader guessing on many points. Will Celestino return to his family safely? How did those paintings end up in such strange locations? Whose body did the author find? So many questions, but all nicely tied up at the end. I can thoroughly recommend this book to lovers of a good mystery.” – Just 4 My Books

“So this is the second book that I have read from Isobel Blackthorn and I still can’t decide which book I liked best! This was a really intriguing mystery/thriller and while quite slow paced it kept you hooked from the beginning….The character development for both Paula and Celestino was great and I really enjoyed watching it progress as the book did. There was a few great twists and turns and I was really excited to see how it ended. Will most definitely be keeping my eye out for the next Isobel Blackthorn book!” NZFMNBlog

“As someone who has enjoyed holidays in the Canary Islands for many years I just couldn’t resist reading this book – and it gives a totally different take on life there! If you thought Sicily was the only island purported to have mafia, think again as they appear to be front and central in the Lanzarote based thriller!

This is an engaging, enthralling story of fighting against corruption in a closely knit island community. It involves plenty of secrets, danger, mystery and suspense to keep you turning the pages right to the very end. It is a story where you’re never quite certain about just who is trustworthy and who is corrupt. It is also a tale of romance as Paula strives to uncover just what has happened to her husband – and why. I found it a fascinating story and will definitely be looking out for more by this talented author in future!” – Splashes into Books

“Another beautiful written tale about the Spanish island and another excellent mystery from Isobel Blackthorn. One of the things I enjoyed about this and a previous one I read (Clarissa’s Warning) is the incomer to the island that is now the place she sees as home. I speak no Spanish and so these characters would be me trying to settle on the island and so they speak to me in a way; the women from elsewhere struggling to fit in and learn the language. That’s hard enough but when you throw in trying to solve the disappearance of her husband then it becomes and even more difficult task and this is so wonderfully woven into the story.

The mystery element of the story kept me guessing to the end and I was fascinated by the corruption angle as it’s something I know nothing about. The author keeps up the suspense all the way through to the end. It’s a great book and as before now I really want a holiday!” Kirk72

“What is always noticeable about Isobel Blackthorn’s writing is the amount of dedication she puts into bringing the culture of her locations to the forefront. In both Clarissa’s Warning as well as A Matter of Latitude, I cannot help but admire her efforts to respect the identity of the locations where she sets her story.

The beauty of A Matter of Latitude is in the use of two prominent and distinctive voices in the story. That of Paula and Celestino….An exciting thriller that has many layers. It is definitely worth a read.” (as is this review! Check it out!)  Trails of Tales

“I’ve really become a fan of Isobel Blackthorn’s writing. She is an incredibly gifted mystery writer and A Matter of Latitude just proves that more. The mystery in this novel is so compelling and keeps you guessing all the way to the end. I love that. I really am not a fan when a reveal comes to quickly and that isn’t an issue at all here. Love this story! The characters feel real, which made me nervous for them. I highly recommend checking this one out!” Jessica Belmont

“Matter of Latitude is a slow-paced mystery thriller, with wonderful descriptions of the idyllic setting in Lanzarote…capturing the atmosphere and culture of the island….a fascinating read with a strong sense of culture….”  Orlando Books Blog

“My first read by Isobel and one I really enjoyed. Having a passing acquaintance with Lanzarote and recognising a lot of place names it made it more real for me.

A fast paced read. Crisp, fresh prose and an insight of Lanzarote away from the tourist resorts. This book will have you second guessing yourself as to who the culprit is! Red herrings galore and while not a gruesome book it is not as cosy as I thought. Art, corruption, murder and sunny Lanzarote. What more can you want?  A good read I recommend to you all.” BertyBoy123

“I really enjoyed the way Blackthorn combined suspense with an authentic feel for the surroundings and the native inhabitants. The struggle of ex-pats to fit in, despite loving the country they have adopted. You can live in a foreign country, speak the language fluently, adapt to the country and new culture, and yet many decades after living there still be considered an outsider or the foreign person.

The story starts with the attempt on Celestino’s life, and I will admit for a moment I thought I was in a post-apocalyptic plot. The beginning of the book really set the stage, even if it threw me for a minute. Meanwhile his wife and child are waiting for him to turn up, and when he doesn’t Paula starts to investigate his disappearance.

I thought the subtle pressure pot plot of the paintings was an extremely interesting way to go about this storyline. The guilty know exactly what is staring them in the face, hence the reactions, but it takes a while for the meaning of the pictures to sink in for others.

At the heart of this plot is the corruption that allows companies and people to profit off the destruction of our environment, but instead of going for other more well-known industries who are guilty of this, the author shows us how corrupt works at a lower level.

The kind the working man can see and is dragged into, albeit inadvertently. The real estate industry is highly exposed to corruption. It is a way to launder money and evade taxes, and on a more fundamental level it exposes the environment and thus humans, to an even greater risk. When land, fields, property and houses are gained by fraudulent means and sold on to developers.

Bought under false pretences, with the sellers pass on property on the basis of it not ruining or the buyers changing the environment. To do so these buyers have to be working hand in hand with the local and sometimes national government departments to get planning permissions. The corruption flows deep and steady.

It’s an environmental thriller about corruption combined with the eccentricities of expats.” (quoted in full) – Cheryl MM Book Blog

This is a thoughtful and emotional work, that kept me absorbed from beginning to end. Recommended.” Lis Carey’s Library

A Matter of Latitude is a mystery that also highlights the corruption and the destructive influence of tourism on the small island. The writing captures the characters relationships to each other and the idyllic setting of Lanzarote. An interesting read that kept me guessing.” – Rainnes

“All in all, this will be an awesome next read for anyone who loves an insightful, interesting look into relationships, and how differently we can all see things. It’s also for anyone who loves a mystery… This is also for anyone who loves a novel where the author has obviously put work into the setting, and the lore. I’d say this would be perfect to enjoy on your next holiday on the beach or wrapped up cosy in front of the fire if you’re staying in the UK this summer.” Vain Radical

“As I mentioned I have read previous work by this author and I knew that the story would be descriptive, where the scenery was as important as the story and I was not disappointed. As you follow the mystery, you are introduced to some amazing scenery and highlighted throughout are important landmarks to the country…Whilst this is a mystery, there is also an insight to how money and corruption is spoiling the landscape and whilst places rely on tourism, it shows what damage it is causing. Another good mystery that will keep you reading to find out that will happen next.” Terror Tree

“This is the first book that I have read by the author, and I am looking forward to reading more by her…The author paints a perfect picture with her descriptions of the scenery. Making me feel like I must give this place ago in the future… I think anyone who loves mystery novels will enjoy it.” – Bakers Not So Secret

“I really like this story, I thought it was well written and I thoroughly enjoyed reading it.  I have been a fan of this author’s works for a while now and this is another fabulous book by her!

I thought that the setting for the book was great and the author did an excellent job with the descriptions in the book as at times I really felt as though I was there with the characters, the author did a great job of drawing me in to the story and I found it was one I needed to carry on reading.  The plot was compelling and I wanted to find out how the mystery would all end!

I loved the different characters and I thought that the storyline was great – highly recommended!” Donna’s Book Blog

“Well wasn’t this a nice intense little journey!…It is interesting to see the struggle of making a life as an ex-pat, on this gorgeous island, something that may still affect me in the future, so this lifestyle was something I was interested in learning more about. The struggle of not being accepted is a fear I think most people have and so to be abroad with a missing husband is doubly scary!…I have previously enjoyed Clarissa’s Warning, also set in Lanzarote, and Isobel’s writing where the scenery and backdrop take a life of their own. This was no different, the imagery used could have you sitting in the sun, soaking the ray of Lanzarote. I wish I was, less the hit and run.” Zooloo’s Book Diary

“A Matter of Latitude is an intriguing, suspenseful novel that weaves together modern global issues. The opening scene is an impressive attention-grab that keeps you turning pages for a very long time. The characters are interesting. I particularly enjoyed the focus on the politics of tourism. Having lived in the Dominican Republic, I identified with many of the issues, as well as the hypocrisy of ex-pats complaining about it. The novel sags a little in the middle and the character POV isn’t very distinctive, making changes in character voice a little hard to follow. However, once I got in the flow, I could follow the plot even if I wasn’t sure who was telling the story for a few paragraphs. Overall, this was a good suspense novel that gave me plenty of thinks.” Author Becca McCullough

I read and really enjoyed Clarissa’s warning and was very excited to see what Isobel Blackthorn would come up with next. I was ensnared by this mystery and kept guessing until the very end. I really enjoy Isobel’s books and can’t wait to dig into another one soon.” – J Bronder Book Reviews

“A Matter of Latitude shows Lanzarote in a light I’ve never seen before. First, in terms of imagery. As a tourist, I never visited the north of the island and it was interesting to read about the daily life of locals. Secondly, was through the tropical storm that occurs at the beginning of the story. The ignorant part of me never imagined that the island could have terrible weather like that, nor did I ever consider how it would affect local life.

However, it was the commentary on Lanzarote’s politics that opened my eyes the most. The author is actually a resident of the island for the insight into corruption was detailed. It backhanders politicians are taking from businessmen who want to illegally cash in from the tourism industry are nothing new in comparison to the rest of the world but are shocking just the same. The fact that much of the available funding goes to non-natives shows that politics is everywhere in the world, even on small, magical islands. Also, the heavy focus on the negative effects of tourism on the island made me consider my trips there from another point of view.” – Joyful Antidotes

Visit the A Matter of Latitude reviews page for more reviews

Find your copy on Amazon